Child Therapy, Consulting, Counselling, Family Therapy, health & wellness, Hypersense Counselling & Consulting Services, Life Coaching, Professional Development, Project Develpoment

Fear of the Unknown

Fear accompanies even the smallest changes or updates, technological or otherwise

The unknown is a physical and conceptual space that is always one step ahead of human experience. Unlike the familiar, the unknown generates anxiety. It occupies a binary theoretical horizon of uncertainty and possibility that results in a multitude of feelings. Some people are comfortable with the unknown always moving forward and seeking new experiences. Others are afraid of change and prefer the comforts of the familiar. Clinical social workers are usually involved with individuals, couples, or families at junctures of transition. People are more likely to seek private counselling support when anxiety and worry associated with moving forward is overwhelming. Even the smallest changes in our lives can lead to bigger unexpected ones. One simple example is the purchase of a cellphone and subsequent social media presences. More than ever, personal electronic devices have infiltrated human relationships and families in real ways. People identify social media as the means to marital and parenting problems; academic, social, and performance issues; or problematical addictive behaviours to videogaming or online gambling. Children and pre-teens are also having difficulty with appropriate social media engagement. Too many young people share personal details or photographs that result in legal or social consequences that require coping skills well beyond an adolescent level of emotional maturity. Too many parents are shocked to learn how deeply engaged their children or pre-teens may be on-line until a serious incident happens. There are many positive aspects to technological advancements in the workplace, schooling, and the home. The rapid pace of technological change is dizzying and daunting. Nonetheless, the unknown is now only a click, post, or enter button away. Developing healthy strategies to manage both familiar and unknown consequences created by modern living in a digital techno-sphere is a shared challenge. Do you feel confident about posting a comment or photo on public platforms? Are your clients reporting situations that require increased familiarity with local child protection or other legislations? How has social media changed your couples counselling approaches, if at all?

#wellness #anxiety #fear #familiar #unknown #socialmedia #legislation #philosophyofcare #ittakesavillage #virtualreality #childprotection #infidelity #modernsocialwork #socialworkers #counselling #psychology

Child Therapy, Consulting, Counselling, Family Therapy, Focus Interviewing, health & wellness, Hypersense Counselling & Consulting Services, Life Coaching, Professional Development, Project Develpoment, Qualitative Data Analysis

Family Values

An important Italo-Canadian family value is shared meal times

Individuals, couples, or families seeking clinical support from registered social workers, psychotherapists, or child therapists enter the work with deeply held views about family traditions, cultures, rituals, and beliefs that have been passed down to generations over several centuries. In some countries, people are still able to leave work for part of the day in order to eat a meal with one another before returning back to business. Family values are heartfelt and central to the ways people live their life. They also shape the ways we understand and solve problems. Something as simple as mealtime together remains a priority in most families. There are several studies that demonstrate the correlation between regular shared meals and overall social and emotional wellbeing. People are more likely to maintain healthy communication patterns with one another when eating at home on a regular basis and at predictable times. The roles members play around food preparation, planning, and clean-up are dynamic and usually shared with everyone involved. It takes time for a clinical social worker to help families express values they hold most dear, and where perhaps, there is some disagreement. Often, mediating these differences of opinion or disagreements becomes the clinical work over several sessions. It is often in these practical spaces of the everyday that people run into problems with one another. It is also in this space that solutions emerge, later, in session. What are your plans for dinner today? How many meals did you share with people who matter most in your life? What, if anything needs to change? What are examples of other values families hold dear and may wish your intervention to protect and repair through your clinical practice?

#wellness #familytherapy #childandfamilytherapy #philosophyofcare #care #health #values #dinnertime #socialemotionalwellbeing #success #healthy