Philosophy of Care


Sadness is part of everyone’s life. What is your care-work with people who express sadness?

From the very moment a person decides to explore a career in Social Work, the beginnings of a philosophy of care emerges. Similar to other health related fields, Social Workers aim to help people, communities, and institutions find ways, strategies, approaches, and solutions to problems they identify. At both clinical and policy levels, social work centralizes care for others in all aspects of practice. Developing an overarching perspective about your role as social worker in relation to care-work with other people is an important process. I liken this process to an ever-changing dynamic or philosophy that continues to blossom over time. For those of us who work principally as clinical practitioners, professional careers broaden in relation to personal growth, life experience, and self-reflection. Many social workers find their professional interests change over time and in relation to their own personal life stage. So for example, a person may start their career working with children and later find marital or couple work more fulfilling. This shift in professional interest is very common during the initial ten to fifteen years in the field. What is your philosophy of care?

#socialwork #healthy #health #emotionalhealth #clinicalsocialwork #efficacy #children’smentalhealth #childtherapy #childandfamilytherapy #familytherapy #moods #wellbeing #policy #determinantsofhealth

Published by Lisa Romano-Dwyer PhD, RSW

I am a registered social worker in the province of Ontario. I am currently creating professional resources for clinical practitioners.

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